Democratic Coordinated Campaign field organizer Stephanie Metzger, 21, of Shadyside (left) and volunteer Leah Clark, 28, of Squirrel Hill register Carnegie Mellon University freshman Ivori Liu, 18, of Oakland, to vote in the Pennsylvania on the last available day to register for the upcoming general election.

Democratic Coordinated Campaign field organizer Stephanie Metzger, 21, of Shadyside (left) and volunteer Leah Clark, 28, of Squirrel Hill register Carnegie Mellon University freshman Ivori Liu, 18, of Oakland, to vote in the Pennsylvania on the last available day to register for the upcoming general election.

Jasmine Goldband / THE INCLINE

The last-minute push to register Pa. voters on CMU’s campus

You have until midnight to register online if you want to vote in the Nov. 8 election.

The clock is ticking: Today is the last day to register to vote in Pennsylvania. 

While paper applications were due at 4 p.m., online registration is open until midnight.

And this afternoon, campaign workers across the city made a final push at voter registration.

David Linden, 22, and Patrick Lloyd, 27, staffers for the Pennsylvania Democratic Party’s coordinated campaign, were on the Carnegie Mellon University campus asking the same string of questions:

“Are you registered to vote? On campus?”

‘It’s the last day to register to vote in Pa. Everybody good?”

From 1 to 2 p.m., the Lloyd and Linden signed up only one voter at Pitt and CMU and between the campuses, in anticipation of the 4 p.m. deadline. They stopped many more, but most said they were already registered. (Other volunteers were also out Tuesday to sign up people.)

Regional organizing director for Western PA campuses for the PA Democratic Coordinated Campaign Patrick Lloyd, 27, of Baltimore, Maryland registers Spencer Diaz, 26, of Bloomfield to vote in Pennsylvania. Diaz works at Carnegie Mellon University  where Lloyd was registering people to vote.

Regional organizing director for Western PA campuses for PA coordinated campaign Patrick Lloyd, 27, of Baltimore, Maryland registers Spencer Diaz, 26, of Bloomfield to vote in Pennsylvania. Diaz works at Carnegie Mellon University where Lloyd was registering people to vote.

Jasmine Goldband / THE INCLINE

Lloyd said it a good sign that most people walking past said they were registered, even if they didn’t want to stop and talk.

“We don’t get discouraged as long as they are registered,” Lloyd said.

JJ Abbott, deputy press secretary to Gov. Tom Wolf, tweeted today that more than 77,000 people across the state submitted voter applications on Monday.

According to the Pennsylvania Department of State, an estimated nearly 2.3 million eligible voters aren’t registered — 180,000 of whom live in Allegheny CountyAs applications are processed, it’ll take a few weeks to see how many of your neighbors eventually registered and are just procrastinators.

Democratic Coordinated Campaign field organizer David Linden, 22, of New York, NY asks people as they cross Forbes Avenue at Craig Street if they're registered to vote in the Pennsylvania.

Field organizer David Linden, 22, of New York, NY asks people as they cross Forbes Avenue at Craig Street if they're registered to vote in the Pennsylvania.

Jasmine Goldband / THE INCLINE

 

Months of work built up to today’s deadline, said Lloyd, regional organizing director for western Pennsylvania college campuses.

“We want to make sure people understand just how important this election is,” Lloyd said. “We want everyone who is living here to be registered here.”

Lloyd added that workers always identify as being with the campaign and are respectful of various opinions. The important thing is to just register, he said. And in a swing state like Pennsylvania, the stakes are especially high.

Once the registration deadline is past, Lloyd said campaign workers will switch from voter registration to voter education and making sure voters come to the polls.

The latest polls have Clinton ahead in Pennsylvania.

The Democratic candidate has an 86.8 percent chance of winning Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes, according to FiveThirtyEight’s polls-only forecast. And USA Today’s poll tracker has Clinton leading polls in Pennsylvania with an average of 47.6 percent to Trump’s average of 39 percent.

×
×

Follow this story

×

Success! You're now subscribed to “Election 2016”

You'll get emails from The Incline as this story develops. You can unsubscribe in every email.